Biographies
Angell, Roger     
A pitcher's story : innings with David Cone
Explores the world of one of baseball's greatest pitchers and introduces his craft, in a candid inside look at one of the most challenging skills in sports.
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Bradlee, Benjamin C     
The kid : the immortal life of Ted Williams
Ted Williams was the best hitter in baseball history. His batting average of .406 in 1941 has not been topped since, and no player who has hit more than five hundred home runs has a higher career batting average. Those totals would have been even higher if Williams had not left baseball for nearly five years in the prime of his career to serve as a Marine pilot in World War II and Korea. He hit home runs farther than any player before him, and traveled a long way himself, as this biography reveals. Born in 1918 in San Diego, Ted would spend most of his life disguising his Mexican heritage. During his twenty-two years with the Boston Red Sox, Williams electrified crowds across America, and shocked them, too. His notorious clashes with the press and fans threatened his reputation. Yet while he was a god in the batter's box, he was profoundly human once he stepped away from the plate. His ferocity came to define his troubled domestic life. While baseball might have been straightforward for Ted Williams, life was not.
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Cramer, Richard Ben     
Joe DiMaggio : the hero's life
A groundbreaking, breathtaking biography of one of the Century's great icons, the late Joe Dimaggio, from the acclaimed Pulitzer Prize winning author of the bestseller WHAT IT TAKES. Few celebrities have captivated the sport's world for as long, or with such depth, as Joe DiMaggio. Here, for the first time, is the definitive story of his life, as told by the award-winning journalist Richard Ben Cramer. In Cramer's hands, DiMaggio's complicated life, from the first game with the Yankees in the 1930's, his marriage to Marilyn Monroe and his rise to hero status, becomes a story of the media, the invention of a national celebrity in America, and the ways in which fame can both build and destroy. Using his renowned investigative skills, Cramer has uncovered startling, even shocking, information about DiMaggio's life and presents them with his trademark combination of 'jarring, unsentimental prose' (THE NEW YORK TIMES).
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Creamer, Robert W     
Babe: the legend comes to life|c[by] Robert W. Creamer.
From Babe Ruth's early days in a Baltimore orphanage, to his glory days with the Yankees, to his final years, Robert W. Creamer draws an indelible portrait of this true folk hero.
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Creamer, Robert W     
Stengel : his life and times
One of the most endearing of American heroes, Casey Stengel guided the New York Yankees to ten pennants in twelve seasons. Here is the brilliant manager stripped naked- the person underneath all the clowning, mugging, and double-talking.
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DeValeria, Dennis     
Honus Wagner : a biography
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Hirsch, James S     
Willie Mays : the life, the legend
Authorized by Willie Mays and written by a "New York Times" bestselling author, this is the definitive biography of one of baseball's immortals.
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Kennedy, Kostya     
Pete Rose : an American dilemma
Examines the life of polarizing sports legend Pete Rose, from his record-setting career to being banished from the game for being an unrepentant gambler, and discusses the complex moral issues keeping him out of the Hall of Fame.
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Lanctot, Neil     
Campy : the two lives of Roy Campanella
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Leavy, Jane     
Sandy Koufax : a lefty's legacy
Draws on more than four hundred interviews with friends, teammates, and opponents to present a portrait of the distinguished baseball pitcher.
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Leavy, Jane     
The last boy : Mickey Mantle and the end of America's childhood
Drawing on more than five hundred interviews with loved ones and fellow baseball players, the author crafts a deeply personal biography of the Yankee great, weaving her own memories of the major league slugger with an authoritative account of his life onand off the field.
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Martínez, Pedro     
Pedro
From the 8-time All Star and 3-time Cy Young Award-winning pitcher, a bold, no-holds-barred memoir of his career, from his hardscrabble upbringing in the Dominican Republic to becoming one of the greatest pitchers of all time.
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Montville, Leigh     
Ted Williams : the biography of an American hero
Traces the baseball legend's initial signing as a teenager with the Boston Red Sox in 1938, his record-setting batting averages, his two-time service as a fighter pilot, and his love-hate relationship with fans and the media.
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Posnanski, Joe     
The soul of baseball : a road trip through Buck O'Neil's America
Posnanski, a former baseball writer for Sports Illustrated and The Kansas City Star accompanied O'Neil on a 2006 cross-country journey to raise awareness of the Negro Leagues. O'Neil, who was in his 90's during the trip, spent much of the time reminiscing with Posnanski about his experiences growing up in a segregated country, being denied the opportunity to attend high school in Florida because he was black, playing in the Negro leagues, and eventually breaking racial barriers in Major League Baseball as both a scout and a coach.
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Tye, Larry     
Satchel : the life and times of an American legend
He is that rare American icon who has never been captured in a biography worthy of him. Now, at last, here is the superbly researched, spellbindingly told story of athlete, showman, philosopher, and boundary breaker Leroy "Satchel" Paige. Few reliable records or news reports survive about players in the Negro Leagues. Through dogged detective work, award-winning author and journalist Larry Tye has tracked down the truth about this majestic and enigmatic pitcher, interviewing more than two hundred Negro Leaguers and Major Leaguers, talking to family and friends who had never told their stories before, and retracing Paige's steps across the continent.
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Vecsey, George     
Stan Musial : an American life
Sports journalist George Vecsey finally gives this twenty-time All-Star and St. Louis Cardinals icon the kind of prestigious biographical treatment previously afforded to his more celebrated contemporaries. More than just a recounting of Musial's life, this is the definitive portrait of one of the game's best-loved but most unappreciated legends, told through the remembrances of those who played beside, worked with, and covered "Stan the Man" over his nearly seventy years in the national spotlight. Stan Musial never married a starlet. He didn't die young, live too hard, or squander his talent. There were no legendary displays of temper or moodiness. He was merely the most consistent superstar of his era, a scarily gifted batsman who compiled 3,630 career hits (1,815 at home and 1,815 on the road), won three World Series titles, and retired in 1963 in possession of 17 major-league records. Away from the diamond, he proved a savvy businessman and a model of humility and graciousness toward his many fans in St. Louis and around the world.--From publisher description.
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Miscellany
    
Baseball Americana : treasures from the Library of Congress
Drawn from the world's largest baseball collection, more than 350 illustrations include vintage baseball cards, photos of famous players and ballparks, newspaper clippings, cartoons, and WPA baseball ads, in a history of baseball's origins, rich heritage, and uniquely American character.
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It ain't over 'til it's over : the Baseball Prospectus pennant race book
Using new statistical tools to evaluate hundreds of pennant races, presents the greatest ones in baseball history, and answers such questions as "Can one player carry a team?" and "How influential are mid-season trades?"
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The Cooperstown casebook : who's in the baseball hall of fame, who should be in, and who should pack their plaques
The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, tucked away in upstate New York in a small town called Cooperstown, is far from any major media market or big league stadium. Yet no sports hall of fame's membership is so hallowed, nor its qualifications so debated, nor its voting process so dissected. Since its founding in 1936, the Hall of Fame's standards for election have been nebulous, and its selection processes arcane, resulting in confusion among voters, not to mention mistakes in who has been recognized and who has been bypassed. Numerous so-called "greats" have been inducted despite having not been so great, while popular but controversial players such as all-time home run leader Barry Bonds and all-time hits leader Pete Rose are on the outside looking in. Now, in The Cooperstown Casebook , Jay Jaffe shows us how to use his revolutionary ranking system to ensure the right players are recognized. The foundation of Jaffe's approach is his JAWS system, an acronym for the Jaffe WAR Score, which he developed over a decade ago. Through JAWS, each candidate can be objectively compared on the basis of career and peak value to the players at his position who are already in the Hall of Fame. Because of its utility, JAWS has gained an increasing amount of exposure in recent years. Through his analysis, Jaffe shows why the Hall of Fame still matters and how it can remain relevant in the 21st century.
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The glory of their times : the story of the early days of baseball told by the men who played it
Presents autobiographical accounts of the early days of baseball from the first half of the twentieth century, narrated by some of its most accomplished players, including such athletes as Harry Hooper, Al Bridewell, Babe Ruth, and Goose Goslin.
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Feinstein, John     
Where nobody knows your name : life in the minor leagues of baseball
Nine minor league baseball players, three pitchers, three position players, two managers, and an umpire share their stories of being in limbo, in a league where at any moment they could be called up-- or back-- to the majors.
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Goodwin, Doris Kearns     
Wait till next year : a memoir
Wait Till Next Yearis the story of a young girl growing up in the suburbs of New York in the 1950s, when owning a single-family home on a tree-lined street meant the realization of dreams, when everyone knew everyone else on the block, and the children gathered in the streets to play from sunup to sundown. The neighborhood was equally divided among Dodger, Giant, and Yankee fans, and the corner stores were the scenes of fierce and affectionate rivalries.The narrative begins in 1949 at the dawn of a glorious era in baseball, an era that saw one of the three New York teams competing in the World Series every year, and era when the lineups on most teams remained basically intact year after year, allowing fans to extend loyalty and love to their chosen teams, knowing that for the most part, their favorite players would return the following year, exhibiting their familiar strengths, weaknesses, quirks, and habits. Never would there be a better time to be a Brooklyn Dodger fan. But in 1957 it all came to an abrupt end when the Dodgers (and the Giants) were forcibly uprooted from New York and transplanted to California.Shortly after the Dodgers left, Kearns' mother dies, and the family moved from the old neighborhood to an apartment on the other side of town. This move coincided with the move of several other families on the block and with the decline of the corner store as the supermarket began to take over. It was the end of an era and the beginning of another and, for Kearns, the end of childhood.
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Gould, Stephen Jay     
Triumph and tragedy in Mudville : a lifelong passion for baseball
Science meets sport in this vibrant collection of baseball essays by the late evolutionary biologist.
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Halberstam, David     
The teammates : a portrait of a friendship
Follows the friendship of Boston Red Sox teammates Ted Williams, Bobby Doerr, Dom DiMaggio, and Johnny Pesky from their playing days in the 1940s to Ted Williams' death in 2002.
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Law, Keith     
Smart baseball : the story behind the old stats that are ruining the game, the new ones that are running it, and the right way to think about baseball
In this informative and provocative book, the renowned ESPN analyst and senior baseball writer demolishes a century's worth of accepted wisdom, making the definitive case against the long-established view. Armed with concrete examples from different eras of baseball history, logic, a little math, and lively commentary, he shows how the allegiance to these numbers--dating back to the beginning of the professional game--is firmly rooted not in accuracy or success, but in baseball's irrational adherence to tradition.
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Lindbergh, Ben     
The only rule is it has to work : our wild experiment building a new kind of baseball team
"It's the ultimate in fantasy baseball: You get to pick the roster, set the lineup, and decide on strategies-- with real players, in a real ballpark, in a real playoff race. That's what baseball analysts Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller got to do when an independent minor-league team in California, the Sonoma Stompers, offered them the chance to run its baseball operations according to the most advanced statistics. Their story in The Only Rule is it Has to Work is unlike any other baseball tale you've ever read"--|cAmazon.com
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Passan, Jeff     
The arm : inside the billion-dollar mystery of the most valuable commodity in sports
"Yahoo's lead baseball columnist offers an in-depth look at the most valuable commodity in sports -- the pitching arm -- and how its vulnerability to injury is hurting players and the game, from Little League to the majors. Every year, Major League Baseball spends more than $1.5 billion on pitchers -- five times more than the salary of every NFL quarterback combined. Pitchers are the game's lifeblood. Their import is exceeded only by their fragility. One tiny band of tissue in the elbow, the ulnar collateral ligament, is snapping at unprecedented rates, leaving current big league players vulnerable and the coming generation of baseball-playing children dreading the three scariest words in the sport: Tommy John surgery."--Provided by publisher.
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Sawchik, Travis     
Big data baseball : math, miracles, and the end of a 20-year losing streak
"Pittsburgh Pirates manager Clint Hurdle was old school and stubborn. But after twenty straight losing seasons and his job on the line, he was ready to try anything. So when he met with GM Neal Huntington in October 2012, they decided to discard everything they knew about the game and instead take on drastic "big data" strategies. Going well beyond the number-crunching of Moneyball, which used statistics found on the back of baseball cards to identify market inefficiencies, the data the Pirates employed was not easily observable. They collected millions of data points on pitches and balls in play, creating a tome of reports that revealed key insights for how to win more games without spending a dime. They discovered that most batters struggled to hit two-seam fastballs, that an aggressive defensive shift on the field could turn more batted balls into outs, and that a catcher's most valuable skill was hidden. Hurdle and Huntington got to work trying to convince the entire Pirates organization and disgruntled fans to embrace these unconventional, yet groundbreaking methods. All this led to the end to the longest consecutive run of losing seasons in North American pro sports history.The Pirates' 2013 season is the perfect lens for examining baseball's burgeoning big-data movement. Using flawless reporting, award-winning journalist Travis Sawchik takes you behind-the-scenes to reveal a game-changing book of miracles and math"--|cProvided by publisher.
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Smith, Red     
Red Smith on baseball : the game's greatest writer on the game's greatest years
Collects the best of Red Smith's writings on baseball from the 1940s through 1981
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Thorn, John     
The hidden game of baseball : a revolutionary approach to baseball and its statistics
Long before Moneyball became a sensation or Nate Silver turned the knowledge he'd honed on baseball into electoral gold, John Thorn and Pete Palmer were using statistics to shake the foundations of the game. First published in 1984, The Hidden Game of Baseball ushered in the sabermetric revolution by demonstrating that we were thinking about baseball stats--and thus the game itself--all wrong. Instead of praising sluggers for gaudy RBI totals or pitchers for wins, Thorn and Palmer argued in favor of more subtle measurements that correlated much more closely to the ultimate goal: winning baseball games.
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Fiction
    
Baseball's best short stories
Collects popular short stories about baseball from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and includes works by Zane Grey, James Thurber, Robert Penn Warren, and Michael Chabon.
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Chabon, Michael     
Summerland [sound recording]
Ethan Feld, the worst baseball player in the history of the game, finds himself recruited by a 100-year-old scout to help a band of fairies triumph over an ancient enemy.
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Duncan, David James     
The brothers K
This touching, uplifting novel spans decades of loyalty, anger, regret, and love in the lives of the Chance family. Here there is a father whose dreams of glory on a baseball field are shattered by a mill accident, a mother who clings obsessively to a religion as a ward against the darkest hour of her past, and four brothers who come of age during the seismic upheavals of the sixties and who each choose their own way to deal with what the world has become.
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Kinsella, W P     
Shoeless Joe
Ray Kinsella's fanatic love of baseball drives him to build a baseball stadium in his corn field and kidnap the author, J.D. Salinger, and bring him to a baseball game
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Kinsella, W P     
Shoeless Joe Jackson comes to Iowa : stories
The title story was the basis for the movie "Field of Dreams".
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Lardner, Ring     
The annotated baseball stories of Ring W. Lardner, 1914-1919
This is an annotated and copiously illustrated edition of 24 baseball stories by Ring W. Lardner, including the six classic stories later collected as You Know Me Al. Two-thirds of the stories describe real teams, real players, and real situations, and the annotation and illustrations serve to identify the references of early twentieth-century major league baseball that Lardner covered as a reporter.
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Lardner, Ring     
You know me Al
In the early decades of the twentieth century, newspaperman and humorist Ring Lardner (1885-1933) made America laugh with his hilarious depictions of odd characters in the sporting world, Tin Pan Alley, and Hollywood. His first great success was You Know Me Al, a fictional series of letters from a popular baseball hero to his friend, slyly revealing the letter writer as a crude, conceited, semiliterate, self-deceiving boob.
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History
Achorn, Edward     
The summer of beer and whiskey : how brewers, barkeeps, rowdies, immigrants, and a wild pennant fight made baseball America's game
Chris von der Ahe knew next to nothing about baseball when he risked his life's savings to found the franchise that would become the St. Louis Cardinals. Yet the German-born beer garden proprietor would become one of the most important--and funniest--figures in the game's history.
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Armour, Mark L     
In pursuit of pennants : baseball operations from deadball to Moneyball
The 1936 Yankees, the 1963 Dodgers, the 1975 Reds, the 2010 Giants--why do some baseball teams win while others don't?
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Colton, Larry     
Southern League : a true story of baseball, civil rights, and the deep South's most compelling pennant race
The story of Alabama's first-ever integrated sports team--the Barons of baseball's Southern League--tracing its 1964 season and the heat of Birmingham and its citizens during a tumultuous year.
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Epstein, Dan     
Big hair and plastic grass : a funky ride through baseball and America in the swinging '70s
The Bronx Is Burning meets Chuck Klosterman in this wild pop-culture history of baseball's most colorful and controversial decade
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Fountain, Charles     
The betrayal : the 1919 World Series and the birth of modern baseball
In the most famous scandal of sports history, eight Chicago White Sox players--including Shoeless Joe Jackson--agreed to throw the 1919 World Series to the Cincinnati Reds in exchange for the promise of $20,000 each from gamblers reportedly working for New York mobster Arnold Rothstein. Heavily favored, Chicago lost the Series five games to three. Although rumors of a fix flew while the series was being played, they were largely disregarded by players and the public at large. It wasn't until a year later that a general investigation into baseball gambling reopened the case, and a nationwide scandal emerged.
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Gay, Timothy M     
Satch, Dizzy & Rapid Robert : the wild saga of interracial baseball before Jackie Robinson
Before Jackie Robinson integrated major league baseball in 1947, black and white ballplayers had been playing against one another for decades--even, on rare occasions, playing with each other. Interracial contests took place during the off-season, when major leaguers and Negro Leaguers alike fattened their wallets by playing exhibitions in cities and towns across America. These barnstorming tours reached new heights, however, when Satchel Paige and other African- American stars took on white teams headlined by the irrepressible Dizzy Dean. Lippy and funny, a born showman, the native Arkansan saw no reason why he shouldn't pitch against Negro Leaguers. Paige, who feared no one and chased a buck harder than any player alive, instantly recognized the box-office appeal of competing against Dizzy Dean's "All-Stars." Paige and Dean both featured soaring leg kicks and loved to mimic each other's style to amuse fans. Skin color aside, the dirt-poor Southern pitchers had much in common.Historian Timothy M. Gay has unearthed long-forgotten exhibitions where Paige and Dean dueled, and he tells the story of their pioneering escapades in this engaging book. Long before they ever heard of Robinson or Larry Doby, baseball fans from Brooklyn to Enid, Oklahoma, watched black and white players battle on the same diamond. With such Hall of Fame teammates as Josh Gibson, Turkey Stearnes, Mule Suttles, Oscar Charleston, Cool Papa Bell, and Bullet Joe Rogan, Paige often had the upper hand against Diz. After arm troubles sidelined Dean, a new pitching phenom, Bob Feller--Rapid Robert--assembled his own teams to face Paige and other blackballers. By the time Paige became Feller's teammate on the Cleveland Indians in 1948, a rookie at age forty-two, Satch and Feller had barnstormed against each other for more than a decade.These often obscure contests helped hasten the end of Jim Crow baseball, paving the way for the game's integration. Satchel Paige, Dizzy Dean, and Bob Feller never set out to make social history--but that's precisely what happened. Tim Gay has brought this era to vivid and colorful life in a book that every baseball fan will embrace.
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Kahn, Roger     
Rickey & Robinson : the true, untold story of the integration of baseball
"In Rickey & Robinson, legendary sportswriter Roger Kahn at last reveals the true, unsanitized account of the integration of baseball, a story that for decades has relied on inaccurate secondhand reports. This story contains exclusive reporting and personal reminiscences that no other writer can produce, including revelatory material he'd buried in his notebooks in the '40s and '50s, back when sportswriters were still known to "protect" players and baseball executives. That starts first and foremost with an in-depth examination of the two men chiefly responsible for making integration happen: Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson. Considering Robinson's exalted place in American culture (as evidenced by the remarkable success of the recent biopic), the book's eye-opening revelations are sure to generate controversy as well as conversation. No other sportswriter working today carries Kahn's authority when writing about this period in baseball history, and the publication of this book, Kahn's last, is a true literary event. In Rickey & Robinson, Kahn separates fact from myth to present a truthful portrait of baseball and its participants at a critical juncture in American history"--|cProvided by publisher.
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Peterson, Robert     
Only the ball was white : a history of legendary Black players and all-Black professional teams
Early in the 1920s, the New York Giants sent a scout to watch a young Cuban play for Foster's American Giants, a baseball club in the Negro Leagues. During one at-bat this talented slugger lined a ball so hard that the rightfielder was able to play it off the top of the fence and throwChristobel Torrienti out at first base. The scout liked what he saw, but was disappointed in the player's appearance. "He was a light brown," recalled one of Torrienti's teammates, "and would have gone up to the major leagues, but he had real rough hair." Such was life behind the color line, theunofficial boundary that prevented hundreds of star-quality athletes from playing big-league baseball. When Only the Ball Was White was first published in 1970, Satchel Paige had not yet been inducted into the Hall of Fame and there was a general ignorance even among sports enthusiasts of the rich tradition of the Negro Leagues. Few knew that during the 1930s and '40s outstanding black teamswere playing regularly in Yankee Stadium and Brooklyn's Ebbets Field. And names like Cool Papa Bell, Rube Foster, Judy Johnson, Biz Mackey, and Buck Leonard would bring no flash of smiling recognition to the fan's face, even though many of these men could easily have played alongside Ty Cobb,Walter Johnson, Hack Wilson, Lou Gehrig--and shattered their records in the process. Many baseball pundits now believe, for example, that had Josh Gibson played in the major leagues, he would have surpassed Babe Ruth's 714 home runs before Hank Aaron had even hit his first. And the great Dizzy Deanacknowledged that the best pitcher he had ever seen was not Lefty Grove or Carl Hubbell, but rather "old Satchel Paige, that big lanky colored boy." In Only the Ball Was White, Robert Peterson tells the forgotten story of these excluded ballplayers, and gives them the recognition they were so long denied. Reconstructing the old Negro Leagues from contemporary sports publications, accounts of games in the black press, and throughinterviews with the men who actually played the game, Peterson brings to life the fascinating period that stretched from shortly after the Civil War to the signing of Jackie Robinson in 1947. We watch as the New York Black Yankees and the Philadelphia Crawfords take the field, look on as theEast-West All-Star lineups are announced, and listen as the players themselves tell of the struggle and glory that was black baseball. In addition to these vivid accounts, Peterson includes yearly Negro League standings and an all-time register of players and officials, making the book a treasuretrove of baseball information and lore. A monumental and poignant book, Only the Ball Was White reminds us that what was often considered the "Golden Age" of baseball was also the era of Jim Crow. It is a book that must be read by anyone hoping not only to understand the story of baseball, but the story of America.
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Thorn, John     
Baseball in the Garden of Eden : the secret history of the early game
Thorn shows how a small religious cult became instrumental in the commission that was established to determine the origins of the game and why the selection of Abner Doubleday as baseball's father was as strangely logical as it was patently absurd. Entertaining from the first page to the last, Baseball in the Garden of Eden is a tale of good and evil, and the snake proves the most interesting character. It is full of heroes, scoundrels, and dupes; it contains more scandal by far than the 1919 Black Sox World Series fix. More than a history of the game, Baseball in the Garden of Eden tells the story of nineteenth-century America, a land of opportunity and limitation, of glory and greed--all present in the wondrous alloy that is our nation and its pastime.
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One Great Season
Achorn, Edward     
Fifty-nine in '84 : old Hoss Radbourn, barehanded baseball, and the greatest season a pitcher ever had
In 1884, Providence Grays pitcher Charles "Old Hoss" Radbourn won an astounding fifty-nine games--more than anyone in major-league history ever had before, or has since. He then went on to win all three games of baseball's first World Series.
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Katz, Jeff     
Split season: 1981 : Fernandomania, the Bronx zoo, and the strike that saved baseball
"1981 was a watershed moment in American sports, when players turned an oligarchy of owners into a game where they had a real voice. Midway through the season, a game-changing strike ripped baseball apart, the first time a season had ever been stopped in the middle because of a strike. Marvin Miller and the Players' Association squared off against Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn and the owners in a fight to protect players' rights to free agency and defend America's pastime. Though a time-bomb was ticking as the 1981 season began, the game rose to impressive--and now legendary--heights. Pete Rose chased Stan Musial's National League hit record and rookie Fernando Valenzuela was creating a sensation as the best pitcher in the league when the stadiums went dark and the players went on strike. For the first time in modern history, there were first and second-half champions and the two teams with the overall best records in the National League were not awarded playoff berths. When the season resumed after an absence of 712 games, the season picked up again with a Nolan Ryan no-hitter. The Dodgers bested their long-time rivals in a Yankees-Dodgers World Series, the last classic matchup of those storied opponents. Sourcing incredible and extensive interviews with almost all of the major participants in the strike, Split Season: 1981 brings back the on-field and off-field drama of an unforgettable baseball year"--|cProvided by publisher.
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Klein, Maury     
Stealing games : how John McGraw transformed baseball with the 1911 New York Giants
"The 1911 New York Giants stole an astonishing 347 bases, a record that still stands more than a century later. That alone makes them special in baseball history, but as Maury Klein relates in Stealing Games they also embodied a rapidly changing America on the cusp of a faster, more frenetic pace of life dominated by machines, technology, and urban culture, "--Amazon.com.
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Posnanski, Joe     
The machine : a hot team, a legendary season, and a heart-stopping World Series : the story of the 1975 Cincinnati Reds
There are memorable teams in baseball-and then there are utterly unforgettable teams like the 1975 Cincinnati Reds. From 1972 to 1976, the franchise known as the Big Red Machine dominated the National League, winning four division crowns, three league pennants, and two World Series titles. But their 1975 season has become the stuff of sports legend. In The Machine, award-winning sports columnist Joe Posnanski captures all of the passion and tension, drama and glory of this extraordinary team considered to be one of the greatest ever to take the field. Helmed by Hall of Fame manager Sparky Anderson, the lineup for the '75 Reds is a Who's Who of baseball stars: Pete Rose, Ken Griffey, Joe Morgan, Johnny Bench, Tony Perez, George Foster, Cesar Geronimo, and Dave Concepcion. Like a well-oiled engine, the '75 Reds ended the regular season with 108 wins and finished a whopping 20 games ahead of their closest division competitor, the Los Angeles Dodgers. But that remarkable year was not without controversy. Feuds, fights, insults, and run-ins with fans were as much a part of the season as hits, runs, steals, and strikeouts. Capturing this rollicking thrill-ride of a story, Posnanski brings to vivid life the excitement, hope, and high expectations that surrounded the players from the beginning of spring training through the long summer and into a nail-biting World Series, where, in the ninth inning of the seventh game, the Big Red Machine fulfilled its destiny, defeating the Boston Red Sox 4-3. As enthralling and entertaining as the season and players it captures, The Machine is the story of a team unlike any other in the sport's glorious history.
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Vaccaro, Mike     
The first fall classic : the Red Sox, the Giants and the cast of players, pugs, and politicos who reinvented the World Series in 1912
Acclaimed author Mike Vaccaro presents a riveting, must-read account of what remains, nearly a century later, the greatest World Series ever played.
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  Olympia Timberland Library Staff -- August 2017