Lacey Timberland Library
Winter 2018

Books that Raina talked about included...

Behar, Ruth     
Lucky broken girl
In 1960s New York, fifth-grader Ruthie, a Cuban-Jewish immigrant, must rely on books, art, her family, and friends in her multicultural neighborhood when an accident puts her in a body cast.

Bowers, Rick     
Superman versus the Ku Klux Klan : the true story of how the iconic superhero battled the men of hate
This book tells a group of intertwining stories that culminate in the historic 1947 collision of the Superman Radio Show and the Ku Klux Klan.

Bruchac, Joseph     
Code Talker : a novel about the Navajo Marines of World War Two
After being taught in a boarding school run by whites that Navajo is a useless language, Ned Begay and other Navajo men are recruited by the Marines to become Code Talkers, sending messages during World War II in their native tongue.

Gemeinhart, Dan     
Some kind of courage
In 1890 Washington the only family Joseph Johnson has left is his half-wild Indian pony, Sarah, so when she is sold by a man who has no right to do so, he sets out to get her back--and he plans to let nothing stop him in his quest.

Larson, Hope     
Goldie Vance. Volume one
Move over Nancy, Harriet, & Veronica. There's a new sleuth on the block! Sixteen-year-old Marigold "Goldie" Vance lives at a Florida resort with her dad, who manages the place. Her mom, who divorced her dad years ago, works as a live mermaid at a club downtown. Goldie has an insatiable curiosity, which explains her dream to one day become the hotel's in-house detective. When Charles, the current detective, encounters a case he can't crack, he agrees to mentor Goldie in exchange for her help solving the mystery.

Lee, Sungju     
Every falling star : the true story of how I survived and escaped North Korea
"This is YA nonfiction. It's the memoir of a boy named Sungju who grew up in North Korea and, at the age of twelve, was forced to live on the streets and fend for himself after his parents disappeared. Finally, after years of being homeless and living with a gang, Sungju is reunited with his maternal grandparents and, eventually, his father"--|cProvided by publisher.

Lee, Fonda     
For a century now, Earth has been a peaceful colony of an alien race, and Donovan Reyes is a loyal member of the security forces, while his father is the Prime Liaison--but when a routine search and seizure goes bad Donovan finds himself a captive of thehuman revolutionary group, Sapience, terrorists who seem to prefer war to alien rule, and killing Donovan just might be the incident they are looking for.

Lee, Stacey     
The secret of a heart note

Maetani, Valynne E     
Ink & ashes
"When Japanese American Claire Takata finds out that her deceased father was once a member of the yakuza, a Japanese crime syndicate, danger enters her life that could end up killing someone"--|cProvided by publisher.

Moss, Miriam     
Girl on a plane
"This is a fictionalized story based on the amazing real life experiences of Miriam Moss, a fifteen year old English school girl who was held hostage on a plane hijacked by the Palestinian Liberation Front in 1970"--|cProvided by publisher.

Odhiambo, Eucabeth A     
Auma's long run
When AIDS devastates thirteen-year-old Auma's village in Kenya during the 1980s, Auma must choose between staying to help her family and working toward a track scholarship that will take her away from home.

Sheehan, Judy     
I woke up dead at the mall
It looks like Sarah's afterlife will be pretty exciting. She woke up dead at the Mall of America, where the universe sends teens who are murdered. Now, with the help of her death coach, she must learn to move on or she could meet a fate totally worse than death: becoming a mall walker. While she has no idea who killed her, or why, Sarah finds out that someone she loves is in grave danger. Can she live with herself if she doesn't make her death matter?

Walden, Tillie     
Ignatz Award winner Tillie Walden's powerful graphic memoir captures what it's like to come of age, come out, and come to terms with leaving behind everything you used to know. It was the same every morning. Wake up, grab the ice skates, and head to the rink while the world was still dark. Weekends were spent in glitter and tights at competitions. Perform. Smile. And do it again. She was good. She won. And she hated it. For ten years, figure skating was Tillie Walden's life. She woke before dawn for morning lessons, went straight to group practice after school, and spent weekends competing at ice rinks across the state. Skating was a central piece of her identity, her safe haven from the stress of school, bullies, and family. But as she switched schools, got into art, and fell in love with her first girlfriend, she began to question how the close-minded world of figure skating fit in with the rest of her life, and whether all the work was worth it given the reality: that she, and her friends on the team, were nowhere close to Olympic hopefuls. The more Tillie thought about it, the more Tillie realized she'd outgrown her passion--and she finally needed to find her own voice.

  January 2018