About Timberland Regional Library

Timberland Regional Library (TRL) is a public library system that provides library services to the residents of five counties in Southwest Washington State: Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, and Thurston Counties. Under Washington State law, TRL is an Intercounty Rural Library District and is funded by property taxes and revenue from timber sales in the 5-county area.

In the 1960's the Washington State Library Commission initiated a demonstration project to improve library services in Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, and Thurston counties in response to requests from the counties' residents. Through this cooperative effort, library services were consolidated to create a more efficient and economical regional operation, to increase the size of the library collections and to provide service for the first time in several rural communities.

Citizens voted in November 1968 to unite the five counties into one library district, the Timberland Regional Library (TRL). TRL services began in 21 libraries with Becky Morrison serving as the first Executive Director. Since 1968, TRL has provided information, reading, and lifelong learning services at 28 libraries offering over 1 million items to more than half a million people. The library system is funded mainly by local property taxes with additional income from timber sales taxes. 

Not only were community libraries added when opportunities and dollars permitted, TRL has introduced state-of-the-art electronic services in order to provide residents with the best available library service; to provide access to all, regardless of physical limitations or geographic location; and to increase the potential of success for everyone in the system’s five counties. All Timberland library programs are free and open to the public. Anyone needing special accommodations to participate in a library program may contact the library one week in advance.

TRL Timeline 1968 – Present

  • Livechat is replaced by Springshare software
  • Open Hours
  • Aberdeen Timberland Library’s Remodel, first major remodel since 2000, with all funds coming from Sherk Fund, Grays Harbor Community Foundation
  • Hawks Prairie Timberland Library, the 29th library, opens for 3 years in rented space
  • Public spaces Refresh: Shelton, McCleary, Ilwaco and Yelm libraries
  • Staff ergonomic areas refresh: Lacey, Olympia, Centralia libraries
  • Service Center – IT Department Refresh
  • Picture Book City – a reclassification project of all picture books into 14 themes so that toddlers, preschoolers, and their caregivers can find books more easily
  • Playaways – preloaded audio books for all ages; Vox books for children (talking books in English and in Spanish) and Launchpads for children with preloaded learning apps games and interactive learning made available
  • Wi-fi upgraded at all libraries and Service Center
  • West Olympia Timberland Library opens June 1 as a demonstration popular library at Capital Mall with a two-year lease
  • Refreshes, interior: Tenino, Packwood, North Mason, Shelton public restrooms, Centralia meeting room,
  • Refreshes, exterior: Hoodsport, Amanda Park, Naselle
  • Board of Trustees approves the purchase of land in Randle, Lewis County for a new Mountain View Timberland Library to replace the rented facility
  • Aberdeen Timberland Library Remodel planning continues with community input
  • Automated materials handling equipment installed at Lacey and Olympia libraries and at Service Center so that patrons can receive their materials more quickly
  • Purchase of two Mobile Services units
  • TRL Storytrails installed in all five counties in partnership with cities, counties, U.S. Forest Service, and additional partners. These walking trails are a fun, engaging way for families to combine a love of nature and a love of reading.
  • Toledo Kiosk Agreement renewed for another 3 years
  • Board of Trustees states 68% staffing goal of the overall budget
  • Board of Trustees unanimously votes to extend 2020-2022 Strategic Direction to 2020-2024
  • Elimination of overdue fines and removal of existing fines – begins January 1
  • TRL closed libraries March 14, due to COVID-19 pandemic and Governor Inslee’s Stay-At-Home Order
  • Introduction of LiveChat at trl.org, expansion of digital content, social media, and virtual programs, including Summer Library Program for all ages extended to October 10 and Anywhere Book Club
  • Created Library Takeout (curbside delivery) with Grab Bags, Take & Make bags, Curiosity Kits  
  • Participated in 2020 Census (first time)
  • Developed Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan as part of 2020-2022 Strategic Direction
  • Montesano Timberland Library celebrated 60 years on September 9
  • Computer tables replaced in 27 libraries
  • Refreshes, interior and exterior: Montesano – exterior paint and refreshed landscaping; Raymond – paint, re-flooring and chimney repair (the latter by the City); Winlock, Olympia and North Mason – paint, re-flooring, new furniture; Lacey – remodel
  • Board of Trustees approve funding for two library trucks, a demonstration library at Capital Mall in West Olympia and one in Hawks Prairie; and Library Express Stand in Grand Mound
  • Kiosk and 24/7 book drop at the Baby Boomer Bikes/Chain & Pedal Café located in Hawks Prairie, Lacey closes before the pandemic, March 14
  • 2020-2022 Strategic Direction planning:
    • Actively involving TRL communities and staff throughout 2019 using ASK questionnaires (online, in person), Community Conversations, Community Check-ins (online, in person), staff surveys and meetings. Strategic Planning Committee consisted of three Board of Trustees members, 3 Administrative Team members, and 12 rotating frontline staff members who met three times to review input and feedback. 2020- 2022 Strategic Direction approved by TRL Board of Trustees at the October 23, 2019 Board meeting
  • “A Universe of Stories” Summer Library Program, June 1 – August 31
  • Timberland Reads Together, Native Voices – Featuring author Tommy Orange, and his novel “There, There” as well as programs in libraries
  • Kanopy streaming service added
  • Expanded Access Hours – pilot program at the McCleary Timberland Library; from 27 staff hours to 91 hours per week for 18 years of age and older.
  • Open Data Portal added to website – data includes financial information (budgets, revenue, expenditures, forecasts)
  • Accepted as 27 Connection Sites in the WorkSource System, known as the America’s Job Center Network
  • Refreshes, exterior and interior: Amanda Park – deck and railings repair; Montesano – roof repair; repairs to interior due to flooding; Oakville – city paints exterior; Hoquiam – new doors installed; Olympia – new paint, furniture and layout; Shelton – roof replacement, exterior painting, siding repaired; South Bend – asbestos abatement; Hoodsport and Service Center – parking lot repaired
  • TRL implemented a soft hiring freeze and took a close look at each position as it opened through attrition. – $700,000 savings
  • “A Universe of Stories” Summer Library Program, June 1 – August 31
    • is recognizable and accessible to any person in the five counties
    • exists as much outside the library as it does inside the library
    • demonstrates the many resources of the library beyond books
    • offers super challenge sheets as an extra literary challenge for those who would like one
    • includes children and adults of all ages
    • new “Beanstack” software for patrons and staff
  • Elimination of overdue fines and removal of existing fines – begins January 1, 2020
    • The Board of Trustees voted at the December 18 Board meeting to eliminate overdue fines and remove existing fines
    • TRL prioritizes connecting to our communities and ensuring equal access for all. Research shows that overdue fines act as a financial barrier for many people.
    • Patrons still responsible to return items by the due date – an item >28 days overdue, considered lost – return item or pay a replacement fee for item; accounts > $10 – suspended borrowing privileges
    • Fines represent less than 1% of TRL’s 2020 budget (2017 – 1.3% revenue)
  • Timberland Reads Together, Native Voices
    • Featuring author Tommy Orange, and his novel “There, There” as well as programs in libraries
  • Open Data Portal added to TRL website
    • data includes financial information (budgets, revenue, expenditures, forecasts);collections data on titles and items held by TRL and their use; technology information such as the number of computers available, internet, Wi-Fi sessions used; library information such as geolocations, hours; cardholder statistics and measures such as aggregated demographic data, number of cardholders, number of cardholders active in the last 12 months; data regarding programs offered at TRL including information about overall attendance
  • Voter Assistance @ Your Library – pilot program at Thurston County TRL libraries
    • Assist visiting voters to register on Election Day, November 5
  • TRL accepted as 27 Connection Sites in the WorkSource System, known as the  America’s Job Center Network
    • Historically, TRL offered patron assistance with resumes, provision of internet access both through desktop computers and through wi-fi, and help with creating accounts on WorkSourceWa
    • TRL staff facilitate connections between residents and WorkSource services and provide information about available services
    • Over the past several years, TRL staff have become part of a Rapid Response Team to help people who recently learned they were losing their jobs.The Rapid Response Team is in partnership with WorkSource, Employment Securities, a local community college and more. The Team responds quickly to the needs of newly dislocated workers in our communities. As we know, unemployment is one of the most vulnerable life events our community members can experience.
    • Rapid Response events provide the opportunity for TRL staff on the front lines to reach out to our community members at their job site and let them know how we can support and facilitate their job and/or continuing educational needs. We invite them to come visit our libraries, use our wifi, and free printing, and answer any questions they may have.
  • Morton and Mineral Pop-Up libraries
    • August/September 2018, TRL focused on ideas for mobile services to reach those members of our community who were not accessing services at libraries. Mountain View Timberland staff identified communities of Morton and Mineral were underserved.
    • The first pop-up in Morton was on March 14th 2019, site selection – Morton Historical Society and the first pop-up in Mineral was on March 21st 2019. Pop-Ups are open twice a month in Morton for a total of 12 hours and once a month in Mineral for 6 hours.
  • Early Learning Storytime Program Pilot
    • More variety in times and days for early learning program offeringsYear-round early learning programs (removing “breaks” from early learning programs)
    • To provide consistent, reliable programming for our most vulnerable, and least served (not by TRL, but by all organizations) populations 
    • Early learning programming is a core, staple service provided by our libraries.
    • Providing more options for times district-wide may improve accessibility to the programs  
    • Research and articles about the importance of early literacy on brain development, especially in the first three years of life when 80 percent of the brain forms, are found in academic and mainstream media on a regular basis
  • Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Project - planning
    • Improved patron experience: ease of use when borrowing materials, in accuracy when borrowing or returning materials, in time-savings, and in freeing staff to provide more direct service
    • Enhanced self-service: enables more self-service options for patrons, increasing privacy and satisfaction.
    • Reduced staff costs, through improved efficiency and increased self-service, allowing staff to focus on other services to patrons.
    • Future technology improvements - enables service options currently unavailable or less effective with barcode technology.
  • Expanded Access Hours – pilot program at the McCleary Timberland Library introduced, February 1, 2019
    • Expanded Access provides increased hours to better serve the needs of library users in a community by allowing access to patrons before or after staffed hours. This service allows for the McCleary Timberland library to be open daily from 7 a.m.
    • 8 p.m. increasing open days from 4 to 7 and open hours from 27 to 91 hours per week. TRL will be piloting Expanded Access in the McCleary Timberland Library for one year to evaluate the effectiveness of this service
    • this project is in direct response to repeated and numerous survey responses from patrons who requested more open hours in TRL libraries.
    • To reduce barriers to accessing library services
    • To ensure that this new service is financially sustainable for future budgets
    • To develop best practices for implementing this new service
    • Patrons (18 or older) can choose to opt-in for the service, and acknowledge that they are comfortable being in the library without staff.
    • Security cameras will be installed in the library to record any incidents. Also, since the service is opt-in and requires library card access, TRL will know who was in the building during a given time period.   
  • Veterans Connection Café, pilot program at the Mountain View Timberland Library – rural veterans service program
    • Provides Veterans and their families to services and assistance through a partnership with WestCare/WA Serves, American Legion Lacey Post 94, Lacey Veterans Services Hub, and Home Depot
    • Teleservices such as tele-health, tele-medicine
  • Community-Led Libraries Service Model planning for 2020-2022
    • To foster more collaborative connections with the communities in our library district by adopting a service planning model that recognizes that:
    • Our organization exists to serve the needs of our communities.
    • The best way to ascertain the needs of our communities is to ask them.
    • The best way to make sure that our programs and services are meeting community needs is to partner with them in the process.
  • This project supports our 2020-2022 Strategic Direction by:
    • Focusing on local communities by increasing our presence in underserved communities.
    • Establishing relationships with socially excluded and non-user communities across our district.Asking those communities about their needs.
    • Developing avenues to address those needs in collaboration with those communities.
    • Partnering with local agencies and organizations to support diverse communities.
  • Classification and Compensation Study for staff
    • Hired consultant, Segal Waters to review and assess job titles and salary analysis and recommendations
    • Board of Trustees approves $1million (Rose, please look up exact amount) and new job titles DATE
  • Materials and Resources Updates:
    • Juvenile and Young Adult books and DVD feature films added to the Lucky Day Collections
    • Assistive technology devices – replaced and updated with new computer aids, vision and hearing devices and daily living items; new device images and updated information added to online catalog
    • Kanopy – streaming service added
  • Technology Updates
    • Checkout stations replaced; computer stations replaced with tables
    • LibraryMarket software purchased for patron meeting room reservations and internal publicity requests
  • Finance Updates:
    • First payroll using Incode software, Tyler Technologies
    • Grants received: $9,000 for Aberdeen Timberland Library – for additional electrical outlets and STEM and Coding Kits for youth to checkout; Washington Digital Heritage Grant $6,187 – submitted to Washington State Library - this proposal is to digitize the written archives of a century-old local women’s organization, the Review Club of Aberdeen. The project would include digitization of the documents, creation of metadata and presentation as a new collection in the Washington Rural Heritage online repository; $25,000 from Grays Harbor Community Foundation for Montesano roof repair
    • Prepared a 20 Year Budget History of TRL that includes population, levy rate, timber revenue, staffing and materials, FTE by year, libraries’ open hours and more available on the TRL website, Open-data page and a 10 year Revenue Forecast Report
  • Facilities Updates:
    • Aberdeen Timberland Library – TRL selects space planner/architect for library interior.
    • Amanda Park Timberland Library – repair of deck and railings
    • Hoodsport Timberland Library - repaired parking lot, installed new patio
    • Hoquiam Timberland Library – new doors installed, Friends funded refurbishment of chairs
    • Montesano Timberland Library –
      • To protect patrons and staff from potential health & safety issues (the main sewer line backed up in both restrooms), the library was temporarily closed on December 11, 2018. The sewer line was packed with paper towels which caused overflow out into the hallway, throughout the library, out the front doors, and also into the return air system.
      • The sub-sheeting of the floor was replaced, the asbestos removed, new carpet tiles installed, two bathrooms updated, with ADA requirements; additional sewer pipe issues have been addressed, installed new service desk. Library re-opened February 19.
      • During repairs, notice of water leakage from roof.Assessed roof repair to be approximately $90,412. RFP issued, roof repaired in December.
    • Mountain View Timberland Library - renewed lease for three years  
    • Oakville Timberland Library – City of Oakville painted library exterior
    • Olympia Timberland Library - replace service desks (combined two of them); paint the atrium; added new furniture, and implemented a large-scale change in the floor plan for ADA compliance; 75% of the collection will be moved during this time. The library closed November 28-February 2 and reopened to the public February 3, 2020. Patrons will be able to pick up their holds in the meeting room – 1-6 p.m. Monday-Friday.
    • Shelton Timberland Library – roof replacement, and exterior painting, and repairs to the siding, trim, fascia. TRL begins space planning on interior of library.
    • South Bend Timberland Library – completed asbestos abatement; library re-opened January 22. -The City of South Bend applied for 0.09% funds (Pacific County Rural Economic Development Infrastructure Funding) and received $30,000 from Pacific County Commissioners to address structural repairs to the library
    • Administrative Service Center - parking lot repaired
    • Combined desks projects:
      • To provide for an improved patron experience and to allow more time for staff to be away from the service desk working in the community and on special projects, staff have been working on combining desks. Lacey, Tumwater, Olympia, North Mason, Shelton, Centralia, and Aberdeen libraries have or have had several desks located in their libraries. These desks were separated along circulation and checkout duties, and information services (youth and adult) duties. The smaller and medium size libraries have always had one desk models.
  • “Libraries Rock!” Summer Library Program
  • Veterans History Project
    • TRL is an official partner of The Library of Congress Veterans History Project, whose mission is to collect, archive, and provide access to personal accounts of American war veterans. Over 170 videos of local Veterans stories can be watched online or checked out materials
  • Technology updates:
    • Redesigned website, new app, new blog, “Voices of Timberland”
  • Lucky Day Collection introduced at each of the 27 libraries, consisting of popular high demand titles available on a first-come, first-served basis. No holds, no waiting, no renewals.
  • New Kiosk and 24/7 book drop installed at the Baby Boomer Bikes/Chain & Pedal Café located in Hawks Prairie, Lacey
  • TRL Story Trail - a partnership project between the Mountain View Timberland Library and the Cowlitz Valley Ranger District brought literacy         to the trails. People can get out to the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and walk the lower loop of Woods Creek Trail #247 while experiencing a story and nature facts.
  • HS 21+ program – complete a high school diploma. In partnership with local colleges (Centralia College, Olympic College, Grays Harbor College, and South Puget Sound Community College), the HS 21+ program allows local adult students to check out chrome books from TRL libraries so that they can earn their diploma and become more competitive in the job market.
  • I-DEA – integrated digital English acceleration – access offered - in partnership with local colleges (Centralia College, Olympic College, Grays Harbor College, and South Puget Sound Community College), the I-DEA program was supported at three Timberland libraries in Elma, Chehalis, and North Mason (Belfair). Students interested in enrolling in I-DEA will be registered and assessed by the partner college. All students placing into English Language Acquisition (ELA) Levels 1-4 based on the college’s placement policies are eligible to take this class. Students will receive ten hours of instruction each week (five hours in-person and five online) during the quarter, taking 3-6 quarters to complete.
  • Hoquiam Timberland Library remodel - City of Hoquiam received additional Community Development Block Grant funding from the Washington State Department of Commerce, along with other grants and private donations, the $1 million project lasted about six weeks. Improvements included exterior and interior painting, new windows, new energy efficient lighting, more electrical outlets, new carpet, ADA compliant doors, and heating and ventilation improvements.
  • Planning for the future: Community Engagement Initiative began in 2018 with ASK Exercises and survey taking place in the libraries, out in the communities, and online.
  • 2018 marked 50 years of service as Timberland Regional Library; celebrations throughout the year. From May 1 – September 30, hosted an Online Art Showcase that gave residents a chance to share their talents based on the theme “Show your Library Love”
  • Capital Facilities Project
  • “Explore Timberland,” a new outreach projects launched to spread the joy of reading and provide more opportunities for community members to access books and library information. New life was given to books that had been taken out of the general collection and re-purposed to doctor offices, laundromats, daycares, pre-schools, and businesses.
  • “Build a Better World,” Summer Library Program ran from June 1 to August 31. New – online registration – and it was the first year adults could participate district-wide. First outcome based survey – 92% of parents and caregivers surveyed reported the reading program maintained or increased their child’s reading skills.
  • Reyna Grande was the featured author for Timberland Reads Together, TRL’s 13 annual community-wide reading program. Ms. Grande appeared at eight events over four days with five presentations in English and three in Spanish, reflecting the diversity in our five-county region.
  • The Microsoft Office Specialist Certification test sites now available at a Timberland library in every county.
  • TRL provisionally accepted into the WorkSource network as connection sites.
  • With grant donations from the Black Hills Audubon Society, birding backpacks available to check out
  • New partnership with Intercity Transit to provide additional locations for Grays Harbor County and Thurston County residents purchase bus passes
  • The Centralia Timberland Library created an expanded, kid-friendly space with a larger learning center, more seating, updated lighting, new toys, and a wall mural by local artist Jo James
  • The City of Elma and the Friends of the Elma Timberland Library replaced the carpet at the Elma Timberland Library. Additional updates included a new layout, fresh paint, and an upgraded teen area.
  • The Hoodsport Timberland Library received a remodel, including replaced floor joists, new information desk, bar seating facing Hood Canal, additional furniture, and lighting upgrades.
  • Social media: TRL is now on Pinterest.
  • MyTRL pilot program with Olympia School District (OSD) - TRL  teamed up with OSD to give over 10,000 students eLibrary cards allowing access to online learning and enrichment materials; there are 48 school districts in the 5 county region.
  • Technology improvements: implemented Pharos(replacement for Internet scheduling software); Ipads, with MobileCirc were purchased for each library for programs and outreach; implemented Sharepoint 2013 for staff intranet
  • Timberland Reads Together: “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Olympics,” by Daniel James Brown  
  • TRL offers a variety of STEAM programs using ozobots, roominate, dash and dots, Makey -Makey, and Squishy circuits. Prenda Code Clubs piloted in South Bend, Elma, and Lacey.
  • TRL’s first Library Card Art Contest for children and teens – winning designs are seen on limited edition library cards
  • The Summer Reading Program focused on exercise and sports; at several libraries, summer included “Cons” - celebrations of comics and pop culture that drew large crowds  of costumed teens.
  • Materials budget reduction: a 16% reduction in the “Materials” budget came late in the year. It amounted to a cut of $579,000 - equally distributed across all material types - items that can be borrowed, downloaded or used online. Most noticeable to patrons was the loss of Hoopla’s streaming video and audiobooks, and the music source, Freegal. These two services, together, cost over $250,000 in 2016.
  • The first three custom-designed courier vans artfully portray the power of libraries to enrich lives. Three more will join the fleet in 2017. TRL’s vans travel the roads of the 7,000 square mile library district six days a week, bringing library materials to people in five counties.
  • Amanda Park Timberland Library - lowered the building onto a new foundation and improved access via a new ramp.  TRL received $30,000 grant from the Grays Harbor Community Foundation, and $250,000 from Grays Harbor County towards this more than $450,000 project.
  • Lacey Timberland Library turned 25 in 2016. Festivities included a concert by the Olympia Aloha Ukulele Pu’ukani, historical highlights and a time capsule.
  • Priority in Youth Services called “Youth Area Refresh,” a year-long initiative designed to assess and enhance the children’s sections of all 27 libraries. This resulted in new furniture, toys, games, interactive displays and early literacy computer stations.
  • A new partnership between TRL and Grays Harbor Transit allows for the sale of bus passes in the county’s eight libraries.
  • Timberland Reads Together book selection was “Timberland Writes Together,” an anthology of short fiction by authors from the TRL region. Nearly 200 local writers submitted stories, of which 15 were selected for the publication, along with cover art created by a resident from Thurston County.
  • Online library card registration now available
  • The OverDrive download collection integrated with the library catalog
  • Social media - added LinkedIn, Instagram, and Teen Instagram
  • Hoquiam Timberland Library - City of Hoquiam receives $704,906 Community Development Block Grant from the Washington State Department of Commerce to renovate the historic (Carnegie) library. Repairs were made to the roof, flooring, elevator shaft, heat and lighting systems, sidewalks, parking garage, doors and windows.
  • The McCleary, Montesano and Yelm Timberland libraries receivd new carpeting
  • Tumwater Timberland Library - the City of Tumwater improve lighting and electrical systems   
  • In November, Raymond city residents vote by a 75% majority to annex their existing library services to TRL.  Prior to that vote, the City of Raymond, which owns the library building, paid for library services through its city budget. Beginning in 2017, taxpayers agree to pay for library services through their property taxes.
  • The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) awarded TRL the Employment Pipeline Award for participation in Customer Service Boot Camps that provided 204 people with job-related library resources.
  • Library Director Cheryl Heywood appointed to the Pacific Mountain Workforce Development Council Board. With this position comes responsibilities and decision-making powers that will contribute to a stronger employment environment in Grays Harbor, Lewis, Pacific, Mason and Thurston counties.
  • New Library Kiosk installed at the Toledo Community Library
  • Technology upgrades: implemented new online public catalog; upgraded to Microsoft Office 2013 on all computers; launched wireless printing in all libraries allowing printing from a personal laptop, tablet or smart phone
  • Collections – launched Zinio, with unlimited free access to digital editions of popular magazines
  • Worked with Joint Base Lewis McCord Initiatives – Workshops and tools for transitioning military to civilian workforce
  • Social media: TRL YouTube channel launched, Teen Tumblr Pilot program
  • Open hours: added 58 more total hours among 26 libraries and Ask-A-Librarian service
  • Facilities: completed building audits of all 27 libraries
  • Olympia Timberland Library celebrated 100 years of library service
  • Cheryl Heywood, former Olympia Timberland Library Manager, begins as Library Director
  • Strategic Planning:
    • Spring, 2013 - TRL launched a Strategic Planning process to develop TRL’s roadmap for where to focus library services and programs to meet the needs of our communities over the next five years (2014-18). A dozen focus groups and a district survey were conducted among 372 people across the five-county library district, including library patrons, staff, community leaders, TRL’s Board of Trustees, Friends of the Library and additional members of the public. The goal of the focus groups and survey was to determine TRL’s strengths, current community issues and opportunities, key priorities and how all those are impacted by a tight budget and changing trends in the way the library will be used in the next few years. From the Strategic Plan four organizational values were identified and prioritized by staff: Service; Integrity; Collaboration and Community Focus. In addition, based on data gathered from the planning process, the TRL Board of Trustees and staff developed six service priorities to focus upon.
  • These priorities include:
    • Strengthen families & youth
    • Support local economies
    • Promote the library as a community gathering place
    • Support community engagement through culture, history and the arts
    • Enhance collections & technology
    • Foster a supportive work environment
  • Theme: “Strong Communities: Building Our Future”:
    • highlighted education and employment resources to equip people, businesses and communities to become more informed and successful. To meet these goals, TRL and each of its 27 libraries developed action plans for the year that prioritized library services and programs, outreach plans and partnership opportunities.
  • “Get the Card” Promotional Campaign:
    • To celebrate TRL’s 45 years of public library service, a 45-day promotion titled “Get the Card” ran from September 16 through October 31 encouraging people to get the smartest card they can carry, their Timberland library card.
    • This new endeavor yielded great results as 3,848 people signed up for a Timberland library card during the promotional period, an increase of 21% over the same time in 2012.
  • TRL’s new Leadership Development Program graduated its first class as nine leaders across the library district completed the 12-month program. Each month included a new perspective on leadership in public libraries.
  • Family Read Aloud program encouraging young children to read or be read to in every room in their house between Dr. Seuss Birthday March 2 and Beverly Cleary’s Birthday April 12.
  • Library Kiosk Opened in Morton:
    • The Centralia College East in Morton and Timberland Regional Library partnered to provide the public a kiosk at the main office of the campus. A drop box was installed just outside the front entrance where materials can be returned.
  • Toledo Votes to Annex to TRL:
    • Residents in Toledo, a city in the southern part of Lewis County voted this past November by nearly a 2 to 1 margin to annex to TRL. After the election was certified in late November, Toledo residents became eligible to get Timberland library cards and start accessing library services. Since the election was held so late in the year, Toledo residents will not begin to pay for library service via their property taxes until 2015.
  • Celebrating 100 Years of Library Service:
    • TRL held three centennial celebrations at libraries: in Centralia in May, South Bend in August and Raymond in September. Each celebration became an opportunity for the people of each city to reflect with pride on their public library, on the generations that came through its doors, the lives it’s changed and the vital services it continues to deliver every day. TRL also partnered with Washington State Parks in its 100th anniversary with contests and a map showing the state parks and libraries in our five county service area.
    • Celebrated the grand re-opening of the remodeled Ocean Park Timberland Library. This upgraded space is nearly double the size of the original library and includes new carpet, shelving, paint, furniture and technology.
  • Technology:
    • Wi-fi hours expanded - increased by six hours every day to 6:00 a.m. to midnight daily. Hours were expanded based on requests by patrons. Wi-Fi use, which began in 2005 increased dramatically of late with the number of sessions climbing from 20,826 (2012) to 33,934 in 2013, an increase of over 60% in just one year. 
  • Collections:
    • Added Hoopla – streaming music, video, and audiobooks service introduced to library cardholders
  • Freegal (free, legal and streaming) music resource expanded with a new streaming option where users can enjoy 3 free hours of music daily
  • Introduced the Microsoft IT Academy, offering hundreds of online certificate courses from basic software applications up through courses specifically designed for IT professionals
  • Nook e-readers made available for checkout TRL - began offering Barnes & Noble e-readers to give patrons another way to access popular titles in our collection. Each e-reader has 15 or more e-books pre-loaded in one of several genres, such as bestsellers, mysteries, science fiction, fantasy, romance, westerns and many more.
  • The number of new library cards issued in 2013 rose by over 10% compared to 2012 figures to 27,738.Also, numbers increased in several areas, including: • Library visitors- 2.8 million (5% increase) • Library materials borrowed - 4.35 million (1% increase) • Downloadable e-books, audio books, music and video- 266,835 (52% increase) • Library programs & attendance - 3,344 programs (19% increase) &82,151 attendees (40% increase) • Reference questions answered - 433,030 (20% increase) • Volunteers - 350 people gave 6,300 hours(number of volunteers more than doubled)
  • The Ocean Park Timberland Library space is nearly doubled in a remodeling and expansion project.
  • TRL introduces several mobile applications to make accessing library services faster and more convenient.
  • Residents of the City of Morton vote to annex to TRL.
  • TRL offers free music downloads through Freegal.
  • The Hoquiam Timberland Library celebrates 100th anniversary.
  • Residents of the City of Hoquiam vote to annex to TRL.
  • TRL partners with Washington Assistive Technology Act Program (WATAP) to offer patrons assistive devices for low vision, hearing loss and limited mobility.
  • Michael Crose begins as TRL’s fifth Library Director.
  • TRL adds downloadable eBooks to the Download Collection.
  • TRL introduced new library kiosk in Nisqually Tribal Library.
  • The Chehalis Timberland Library celebrates 100 years of library services.
  • The Ilwaco Library moves back into the renovated library.
  • Residents of the City of Shelton vote to annex to TRL.
  • A kiosk with TRL computers is installed at the Rainier Volunteer Library* in the Rainier Historical School.
  • A new library opens in Chehalis with Washington’s only library drive-up window. Over 80% of the costs were funded by private donations.
  • Residents of the City of Aberdeen vote to annex to TRL.
  • The Ilwaco library moves to temporary quarters and a major renovation of the library begins.
  • TRL adds downloadable music and videos to the Download Collection.
  • A new library building opens in Westport.
  • TRL provides downloadable audio books.
  • Spanish Language Interface installed on self-checkout stations.
  • A kiosk with TRL computers is installed at the South Puget Sound Community College, Hawks Prairie Center campus to provide library services to students and the public.
  • TRL provides WiFi, wireless Internet connections in the libraries.
  • The McCleary library moves out of City Hall and opens in a remodeled Laundromat.
  • Residents of the City of South Bend vote to annex to TRL.
  • Jodi Reng begins as TRL’s fourth Library Director.
  • The Yelm library moves out of City Hall and opens in the second-story of a new building that boasts the city’s first elevator.
  • Self-checkout service begins in 4 libraries and expands to all Timberland libraries.
  • With a 21st Century grant, Educational Services District 113 teams with Timberland Regional Library to open Cooperative Library Centers with TRL collections and service in six remote communities: *Taholah, Matlock, North River, Rochester, Boistfort and Wishkah.
  • TRL installs children’s CD-Rom stations at all libraries.
  • Ask A Librarian, TRL’s 24/7 Reference & Information chat and email service begins. The public receives direct telephone access to TRL Central Reference librarians.
  • TRL installs Internet filter, Websense, filtering child and youth computers and providing optional unfiltered Internet access in adult-section computers.
  • A new North Mason library opens in Belfair, replacing a beloved, but too-small library building. The new library wins a national architectural award.
  • TRL implements email notification of patron holds and overdues.
  • Telecirc begins automated telephone notification of patron holds and overdues, saving turn-around time, paper, and approximately $100,000 in postage each year.
  • TRL launches its own website to provide library and information services remotely.
  • A library building replaces Hoodsport’s storefront library. The building was the former North Mason library, barged down the canal, remodeled, and reopened—with a view.
  • City of Tumwater, in partnership with the Tumwater School District, builds new library near City Hall.
  • TRL installs dial-up modems connecting patrons to library catalogs and magazine databases.
  • A new library opens in Elma.
  • Thelma Kruse begins as TRL’s third director.
  • A new library for Salkum opens in a remodeled service station, a bit of lore that locals love to share.
  • Districtwide Central Reference telephone service begins.
  • City of Lacey builds new library next to city hall.
  • New library buildings replace stationary bookmobiles in Amanda Park and Naselle. The Amanda Park library won a national architectural award.
  • The South Mason and Shelton libraries merge into one location in Shelton.
  • Hoodsport library opens in a storefront.
  • TRL upgrades from ALIS to the Dynix circulation system, enabling patrons to search and place holds on library books and other items by computer.
  • Mountain View library opens in Randle.
  • The Tenino library moves into its present location.
  • Naselle library begins offering service via a stationary bookmobile.
  • Ocean Park library opens.
  • Lon Dickerson becomes TRL’s second director, succeeding retiring Becky Morrison.
  • ALIS (Automated Library Information System) replaces the traditional card catalog.
  • The Westport library, located in City Hall, joins TRL.
  • The Packwood library moves to its current log cabin location.
  • TRL builds a library in Belfair on land purchased by the Friends of the North Mason Library.
  • Library books are purchased electronically by computer for the first time.
  • The Olympia library moves to its current downtown location.
  • The Grays Harbor County bookmobile opens as the Amanda Park library.
  • The TRL Administrative Service Center opens with federal funding.
  • Permanent library buildings replace bookmobile service in East Lewis County.
  • A TRL-owned library building opens in Packwood.
  • City libraries in Elma, Hoquiam, Chehalis and Tenino join TRL.
  • A joint book catalog listing the holdings of all Timberland libraries is completed and made available to patrons. Holdings are shared throughout the five-county library district.
  • TRL is created in December as an Intercounty Rural Library District by a vote of the residents of the unincorporated areas of Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason, Pacific and Thurston counties. Becky Morrison is the Library’s first director. Today’s Timberland libraries that were part of TRL from 1968 are those in Aberdeen; Belfair (the North Mason library); Centralia; Ilwaco; Lacey; Montesano (the first building owned by TRL); Oakville; Olympia; communities in East Lewis county that now have libraries in Packwood, Randle and Salkum; Raymond; South Bend; Tumwater; Westport; Winlock and Yelm. Bookmobiles served some of the communities initially.